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Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
2.5% or so, these companies have figured out how to make money in a slow growth environment so combined with that, 4%, 5% earnings growth, that's reasonable in the kind of environment that we're in right now. >> no great shakes in terms of earnings growth. >> no. >> but good enough is what you're saying. >> that's right. i think it's good enough. >> what's priced into the market though? i mean, we've got expectations that we'll see much higher prof materialize or what? >> you know, really i think the market, you know, the p.e. ratio, if you look at valuations as far as that metric goes, i mean, the market is not willing to take the pes very high, may inch higher, 14, 14.5 or so, by the end of next year. the market knows we're in a slow growth environment. we're not going to get strong gdp, and it's not willing to assign much of a pe to these earnings. that's going to be a continuation, but next year i think investor confidence is going to improve a little. it's really lagged in this rally, so i think we're just going to be able to inch it up enough to where we have a decent yea
is not hospitable environment. ed markey is running nomnation in liberal state. picking up green group nominations. that same day the league of conservation voters. i think more about that, than anything else. for him to be shocked people respond to tax policy is itself shocking. melissa: if you tax something, it is meant to discourage whatever behavior that is. shell responded and said while we're aware of the tax environment wherever we operate the driver for our operational decisions is going to be governed by safety. the tax policy in question i would add, by the way is that they were think of drilling on the outer continental shelf, there you would pay regular federal corporate income tax of 35%. otherwise, they were paying the alaska production tax which can be as high as 75%. i say if they were moving it for tax reasons they should just own it and get out in front of it. what is wrong with that? so you're moving it to go drill in a spot or keep it in a spot that is going to provide a better tax environment for you. this is company. isn't that what they're supposed to do? >> it is but also,
's not only bad for the economy, but hurt the environment as well. "varney & company" is about to begin. karen anjeremiah. they don't know it yet, but they' gonna fall in love, get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right after they get married, they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary, not commission. they'll get straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> good morning, "varney & company," viewers. today is monday, january 7th and gerard depardieu, well, he's welcomed to russia with open arms and here, we're going to welcome with you open arms, with sandra smith and on the floor of the new york stock exchange, of course, nicole petallides. hey, you remember the cash for clunkers, that 2009 government program that gave people money, a the lot of money to buy more fuel efficient cars if they traded in the old gas guzzlers, as i
think they represent necessarily the average parent who i think would prefer an environment where their child wasn't exposed to that kind of risk. >> vice president biden of course is working really hard at this and is meeting with a lot of groups. and speaking of federal law, would you be more comfortable if this was a federal law that would make it so that public schools could not have teachers who were armed or do you believe that should be up to the local districts? >> i think this needs to be a national consensus. i think we need a federal law on that. i don't -- i don't believe that -- if you create anomalous environments where those things are available, you have too much bleed thru, i think we need to have consistency across this. parents should feel comfortable regardless of where they live. >> rhonda, has there been any student reaction to this? what is their takeaway knowing the teachers in their schools may be secretly armed? >> well, i mean, you used the word "secretly." but we do have, as was mentioned, the law in the entire state of utah. and the bottom line is we a
consider this a hostile environment? social security administration reprimanding an employee whose coworker says he continuously passed gas. the agency later rescinded the punishment against the employee. i just don't know where to go with this. but is this a hostile work environment, eamon? >> i don't know. i'm just glad i'm here in the studio by myself, tyler. i'm not with you guys. i have no idea -- >> maybe we're glad we're not with you. >> how small is the cubicle, that the question. when we are in the workplace with other people, we have to deal with other people and all of their weird stuff. some of it is really weird and some of it is offensive and that's part of being a human being. >> i guess a lot of things are part after being a human being. how about you, jane? i'm interesting to hear -- >> i know, i had brothers, husband, i know all about this. my feeling is, that you know, some people obviously can't lep it. but there are product out there. gas begone. go to gasbegone.com. where the tag line is, don't blame the dog. which, by the way, i have. they have cushions. i did somethi
to be an economic and political environment. that's going to be the story for 2013. >> we get a lot of people who come in who it seems to me lately there's a big divergence. there are those who are optimistic about things and think things will go well. others that say, forget it, we've seen all the gains. which camp would you put yourself in? >> i guess i'm not wholistically in either camp. it's more an optimist than a pessimist. we've seen stock correlations begin to fall a little bit. that's encouraging. it says that investors are begin to go loor fop companies that figure out how to make money in a slow growth environment. not sure what the indices will do, but i think the companies that are positioned to save other people company. i was thinking about the people who sell cnbc their coffee cups. you don't do that. somebody has figured out how to do that on large scale and make a lot of money doing it. so those kinds of companies we're going to look for. that means selectivity. that means looking in place that's we don't like from a mook row point of view such as europe. >> but from the average
world environment. and the lingering allegations of corruption, nepotism, hangs over his head. >> his brother and father were assassinated, so in some ways he's also trying to stay alive in that country. and facing that possibility, as well. it's been a contentious relationship with karzai over the years. he's had better relationships with some of the generals there like general stanley mcchrystal than he has with others. and i talked with pentagon officials yesterday who were saying they weren't sure how these meetings were going to go because you just never know when you're dealing with president karzai what you're going to get. and in fact i even e-mailed a couple days ago the folks i met in afghanistan during previous trips and they were somewhat concerned, as well, saying they weren't exactly sure what karzai was going to say while he was here with president obama because a lot of people in afghanistan especially some of the leaders there still very much want u.s. troops because they're fully aware that the afghan forces are not going to be ready by the end of next year. >> absol
an environment of better economic growth. rates might go higher. we think the immediate part of the curve is probably the safest place for the investors who are looking or think rates might be going up. then the other is you need to play the revenue space. there's a lot of high quality credits out there. but the yields are low. you're not really getting compensated. from a risk reward perspective, like health care and transportation, like housing and education offer a lot of value with not a lot of risk. >> so tell me how the fed plays into all of this, peter. there was all that noise last week about the division among fed members on how long the stimulus program should continue or will continue. if rates stay low and they don't fall any further, what's the impact of the growth in the muni bond market? how does that play into it? >> that's a great question. that's one we're talking about here as well. i think it's important to realize that the fed was only beginning to talk about having a debate or a discussion about removing that qe. so they've been anchoring on the long end of the marke
they're low you're comparing them to a pristine environment that was the wilderness but the level you're finding are lower than what we would find in most cities. >> right now, well these are wilderness lakes we should say. these lakes are anywhere from 30 kilometers or sorry, 60 miles to 60 miles away from the major source. you have to fly into the lakes typically with a helicopter or something. they're not right no the oil sand operation. what is i think important to say, if you look at our most polluted site, which is about 15 miles let's say approximately from the major operation, if you look at that, that current levels would find in a city. what is different in many cities and many areas, these pollutants, specific ones we're looking at here, hydrocarbons are decreasing. what we're seeing they're increasing and if you look at predictions just from the oil sand development people themselves, they're estimating in the next 50 years they will increase 2.5 times or 150%. if you do back of the envelope calculation if nothing else changes very soon we'll be reaching levels that are qu
of the marine environment. the have biggest brain to body weight ratio. they have the best sonar and vision. these guys are no dummies. >> reporter: orcas are led by the females, who live up to 80 years. in this case, it's believed the grandmother found an opening and led them out. it will be up to her to keep them alive, navigating a patchwork of ice for hundreds of miles in search of the open sea. neal karlinsky, abc news, seattle. >> and god speed to them. >>> and coming up next here, can you guess why this song could save you from a car crash? ♪ hold me closer tiny dancer th l. aid it. how did i know? well, i didn't really. see, i figured low testosterone would decrease my sex drive... but when i started losing energy and became moody... that's when i had an honest conversation with my doctor. we discussed all the symptoms... then he gave me some blood tests. showed it was low t. that's it. it was a number -- not just me. [ male announcer ] today, men with low t have androgel 1.62% (testosterone gel). the #1 prescribed topical testosterone replacement therapy, incre
much money. the deposit growth here is unbelievable. but in this environment, people want net interest margin. they want the bank to make more money or more mortgages. >> some banks out there, just declined only six basis points. that's how optimistic some on wall street will be going into this quarter. the sequential decline, it's 3.56 for the fourth quarter from 3.66 in the third. as you mentioned, ten-base point decline. so that picture has been dimming a bit. total lending has increased. >> not enough to offset the incredible increase in the deposits. what did they take in over -- >> $30 billion in the quarter. >> 12% annualized. even with that rescinding of the insurance beyond 250,000, still deposit flows. yet you can't put it into productive loans or you don't want to because you worry about credit quality and we end up with contracting energy -- >> look, we're at a moment where i don't think anybody who's got a mortgage, they know they're getting a good price. the ohio regionals are going to do better. that welgs is now a sale. look, wells could go to 33. if it had been to 32,
environment. if the yield curve starts to stephen as we've seen in the -- to stephen as we've seen in the first weeks of 2013, that will eliminate net interest margin pressure. profitability should improve for the group. >> how much do you care about what's going on in washington over the next two months? >> i think that's important because the austerity measures being talked about in washington will slow general economic growth in the country. and as you know, that's a real driver for bank loan growth. and so if those austerity measures are too much and puts us into possibly a recession or just slower growth, that will affect the outlook for the banks. i think you're going to see that the housing market's going to continue to grow. and that's going to be a real driver to the success of the banks this year. >> okay. now in your note to clients, you say that your four best ideas -- i'll list them. walk us through why you like them. you like discover financial services, fifth third bancorp, pnc financial, and wells fargo. >> yes, when you hook at starting with the last one, wells far
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problem or not. they get very upset because they don't. they have been destroyed by our food environment. i think these studies will come together and show that we have a couple addictive things, just like cigarettes. which sounded crazy a long time ago that people would say junk food would be linked, parallel to the tobacco court rulings. but, you know what, we're going to get there. i'm sure of it. >> well, you know, be prepared to hear from the corn refiners association. >> soda pop industry, come at me, too. tell me you're not selling complete poison. some nutritional value in pepsi. something in orange soda adds value to our diets and our body. don't look at me. what's wrong with you? >> let's all go out after the show and have some twizlers and talk this through. >> these are the things we have been eating for decades and drinking for decades and then we have an obesity crisis and we can't make the link? >> it's very possible the science will take us there. we do know where the science is for sure which is a diet on whole fresh fruits and vegetables primarily with small amounts of
it is that they have no intention of doing, anyway. basically, we live in an environment where things are going to continue to change and businesses are going to feel money if they feel there's an end demand that justifies that. there's end demand in china, end demand globally and moderate end demand in the u.s. the reality is businesses have done relatively well for the last two or three years and will continue to. >> real quickly, herbalife later this week will be making a big presentation trying to defend itself from bill ackmann. your thoughts? >> look, i happen to feel that waging your short selling campaign on the air waves a way of dictating stock price, i am personally uncomfortable with. i think it's the wrong way to go about investing because it raises all these questions of are you making a legitimate analysis of the underlying business of the company or are you trying to shift the momentum in order to make money off the stock direction? >> you don't think that bill ackmann is going out, and then selling without us knowing? >> no, i don't believe that. i just don't think that's the
, will that maybe prevent you from being more bullish in this environment because there is still so much uncertainty? >> you know what? i think politicians are starting to realize they can't play this jousting match they have been having with the last debt ceiling, the fiscal cliff which is behind us temporarily. so i think when they come to the table with a solution, the markets are going to rally just like they have in the past. i think they're going to come up with a solution but until there is a solution, until there is something, i think we'll see some volatility. but i really think they will come to the table with a good, solid solution. it will give republicans a chance to put their foot down on some of these, on some of this public spending. and it is going to be positive for the investor. ashley: bob, let me finish with you. you like emerging markets. people say that a but which market in particular are you particularly hot on right now? >> well, actually we think china is poised to begin growing faster than expected again. pmis came out last month and they're above 50 again and i think the
of opportunity in the community banks at this moment. a very tough operating environment with net interest margin low side and saw the other mortgaged-related issues and regulatory scrutiny that as been promulgated. but with the mn t, particular attention to it. it could be another dollar of earnings potential factored into those shares of the course of 2013. pay particular attention. liz: thank you so much. he lives and breathes the stuff. the closing bell ringing in seven tents. we crossed the flat line. all green on the screen. is this the end of the pc era? to the first time in five years, they sales fell and two names attacking the heat. with stocks after the break. ♪ what are you doing? nothing. are you stling our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. ♪ [ indistinct shouting ] [ male announcer ] time and sales data. split-second sta
. it costs a lot of money. in this case it is also costing the environment. >>steve: thanks for the cheery report. >> i was at the redskins game so i'm in a bad news. i'm hosting varney together. we're going to have grover norquist. we're going to give him a heart time because i say this fiscal cliff might have been his waterloo. >>steve: in a couple of minutes, the former marine who wrote a scathing letter to dianne feinstein will join us live. >>gretchen: matt damon wants us to believe that fracking is bad in his movie but a secret report says no fracking way. ♪ [ male announcer ] how could a luminous protein in jellyfish, impact life expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment informati
, that it would be a much safer environment? >> i -- i absolutely -- i wouldn't consider carrying one if i didn't feel like i could do it safely. >> but what if you had a parent who objected to it? what position would that put you in? >> well, in the state of utah, a parent doesn't have to know about it. teachers can carry a firearm and nobody ever -- they've been doing it for 12 years. i've found out more and more about teachers that do. and employee -- >> the teachers have had guns in schools for 12 years in utah? >> yes, yes. it's been legal to do that for 12 years. >> and parents haven't known about it? >> right. you don't have to tell if you're a concealed weapon holder. >> do you think parents have a right to know? for instance, if my child was in your classroom, do you think that i would have a right to know that there is a firearm in that classroom? >> well, if -- if -- i personally would feel okay with any of the teachers, teachers i know, any teach they're i've ever met. they have the -- >> but i'm talking about the parents. >> right, right. >> i want to focus. the parents are droppin
and suburban environments particularly. because what we're looking at in montana is not quite the same as what we may be looking at in chicago or places around the nation. >> cynthia -- >> what do people need them for in montana? what do people need them for in montana? i grew up in alabama, in deepest, reddest alabama. my father loved hunting. i grew up with shotguns and rifles in the house. he never -- it was a rural area. he never felt the need to have an assault weapon. the deer weren't armed. so why do you need an assault weapon? i don't understand -- [ overlapping speakers ] >> i did not say assault weapon. >> why do you need one? >> i did not say an assault weapon. what i'm saying is when you're putting a solution in place we're still going to have to be mindful or the compliancy in chicago and new york city versus people in the big west. people such as residents in montana or the dakotas. we're going to have to be mindful. i'm not saying i'm defending people having assault weapons. those are weapons of war and they too often get in the hands of people that hurt folks throughout america
normal, if you will, in a lot of these companies given the fact that the regulatory environment is getting worse and globalization is not necessarily on their side where it was so many years ago? is this going to be the new normal? well, i don't think so. here's the question. will the politicians get it right? will we go over the cliff, another debt ceiling and if we don't we could have a very robust capital markets this year, an that's what encourages me for the big money centers. for the smaller guys starved for loan growth and margin pressures they will be buyers. the really small guys will be the sellers and you'll see a lot of m & a opportunity out here. >> jason this morning you raised estimates on three banks. you lowered estimates on nine banks. tell me what was behind that. you're expecting the quarter to be what, more negative than positive for the sector overall? how do you see it? >> fine tuning here and there with overall estimate. i think generally for the earnings for the quarter. we think about half our banks will beat expectations. half miss. if you think during
we like wells fargo a lot. they get hurt in a low rate environment, they'll be helped a tremendous amount when short rates move up, and investors have not yet been willing to believe that the mortgage profits are sustainable. even though wells has got 30% market share of the mortgage market, which over time should be a positive. it's just they're not willing to give them full credit for it yet. >> moshe, thanks for your time. >> thanks very much. >> i did want to discuss some breaking news on morgan stanley. the company, a number of news outlets reporting job cuts coming there. we can confirm and clarify some of those reports. morgan stanley sources close to the company indicating they will cut about 6% of its overall institutional securities, and infrastructure staff. those cuts will total 1,600 jobs, half would be international, half will be domestic. again, 6% of securities and infrastructure. now, putting that in perspective, the company has 57,000 total employees. some have reported 6% overall, that is not correct. again, if you do the math, it would be 1,600 total. they've be
. that's the bleed air. and that bleed air usually does everything from controlling the environment within the cabin, the heating and the cooling, onboard electronics. what makes the dreamliner so different, so unique, is the amount of innovation that's gone in to using these lithium ion batteries in order to run the electronics on the plane. well, part of the problem here is, you're taking an amount of electricity that is coming off of these generators, in a very confined and small space, andrew, i mean this would be different if you were in the middle of a power plant. you'd say no problem. companies do this all the time. now you're trying to do this inside of an airplane. we should point out, this has gone through certification at the faa, repeated testing. it's not like they're just throwing these planes up there and there hasn't been any kind of safety checks. they went through extensive tests. if the issue now is was there, and this is something i think we're going to hear about in the next couple of days, is there a specific, perhaps malfunction with some of the electronics a
difficult to get a loan than five or seven years ago. everybody know that is the lending environment was too loose. anybody could walk in and you didn't have to prove income and you could probably get it with no down payment. that department make sense. huh no skin in the game and so many loans went bad. the pendulum has swung and the lenders are worried that if they make loans now that they have financial liability. the rule is the ability to repay. if the borrower does not demonstrate the ability o ability to repay, the loan goes bad and the lender can be charged. >> this protects the lender as well. >> exactly. if they use these new rules that everybody will, it will be designated a qualified borrower. qualified borrowers are like preapproved by fannie mae and we will take loan and if it goes bad, it's our fault, not yours. >> how does it affect the howing market? >> not good. a lot of the market depends on first time home buyers. these are people who most need help. they tend not to have much in the way of a down payment and tend not to have the best credit in the world. they are just ge
in our urban environments and yes, under these circumstances where somebody goes in and shoots up a movie theater or shoots up a school. let's take the steps that make the most sense today. i had a great conversation yesterday with vice president biden. and i know he is preparing his recommendations to the president. and i don't want to get into the details of the discussion, but he's got this down pretty well. he understands what we need to do to make it less likely that these things are going to happen in our cities and towns and these mass murders could be limited at least going into the future if some common-sense things are taken. the magazine thing is very big. >> wes. >> and it seems like a large part of the issue as well is there are actually laws that are sitting on the becomes, laws that are supposed to be enforced by atf and federal authorities that they have not had the capacity to be able to enforce. where does that fall into the larger conversation as well, and what can states and municipalities do to actually enforce what's there right now, but we have been woefully insuffi
environment. there are still plenty of people who think the debt ceiling issues could be a debacle. february 15th, a little earlier than expected, a lot of people floating ideas that moody's might downgrade the u.s. debt sometime this quarter, if there's no grand bargain that ever appears, and that looks increasingly unlikely. i'm in the camp that the risk is to the down side on the stock market right now. earnings today, as you just mentioned here, look, the question has been whether or not putry was the trough in earnings that things would get better from here. it's going to be modest improvement. q4 isn't looking that great. we're only looking at roughly 3% improvement in earnings. that's not great. top line growth has been nonexistent throughout last year. q3 top line growth was zero. zero. we haven't seen that in a long time. you want to know how weird that is? the ten-year eenaverage is 7%. maybe it will be 3%. that's the hope. it's coming down as we're going in. so we may be at a trough in the third quarter, but the fourth quarter certainly isn't going to be gangbusters right now here
in the pool or humid environments, talking in the rain, you'll be protected with the coating. >> oh, no way. >> there you go, brooke. amazing. >> have him pull it back out and turn it on. because i don't believe him. >> just so i -- okay, i'm going to dump one here as well. and let's pull it out, make sure that it is working. >> or that was a really nice iphone 5. look at that. look at that. so when is this on the market, dan? >> how do folks -- so brooke is asking, we all want to know how can you get this? >> we're working to implement this in a lot of carriers and retailers. you can actually go into a store, or go to www.liquipel.com, order it and we'll send the device to us. we're based out of orange county, california, looking to go across the u.s. we're in hong kong and malaysia, australia, russia, and turkey. and about to be in china as well. >> thanks very much, sam. costs you about 60 bucks. one more time, brooke. there you go. we're going to be at ces over the next couple of days. we're looking for fun companies like this, but companies that have a real practical implication in peo
with a cascading flood of cuts. and for that kind of an environment, you don't need somebody who is an outsider who doesn't have the practical experience and who's nakedly ambitious for the job. >> tom cotton is a republican congressman, veteran of the wars in iraq and afghanistan. thank you for coming in. >> thank you, wolf. good to be here with you. >> why do you oppose the nomination of chuck hagel to be defense secretary? >> wolf, the president said that chuck hagel is the leader our troops deserve. i couldn't disagree any more strongly. our troops deserve much better than a man who voted to send them to war when it was popular and then abandon those very troops when it was unpopular. i would know, wolf. i was one of those troops. i returned from iraq in november 2006 with my platoon from the 101st airborne just as chuck hagel was writing that we couldn't achieve victory in iraq, that time for more troops had passed and it was time to withdraw. he just didn't oppose the surge, wolf. he called it the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country's history since vietnam. he delayed emerge
or attempts on his life three times and operates in a very difficult political environment and has an insurgency going. so i think if you put all of those factors in play, suddenly you get a better measure of the kind of what he has facing him. i'm not saying that president karzai is a perfect leader. but what i'm saying is we should try to understand that context and i think it can allow us to deal better with a leader like him? >> in your book you write this about the afghan president. hamid karzai was a man of strong emotions and loyalties rubbed raw sometimes to cynicism by long years and slowed to trust but chited to relationships. you spent a lot of travel time with him. bottom line, is he doing what he needs to do? >> well, i'm not on the ground to junl the current activities but i think he's doing what he thinks he has to do, and that is navigate a western coalition that is very skeptical of the mission and desirous of pulling out, dealing with a taliban insurgency and then internal politics. so i think if you really look at his challenge, he's walking a tight rope in a sti
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)

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